Tradition

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Our family Christmas Eve tradition

Tradition.

That word reminds me of a scene from Fiddler on the Roof when the character Tevye says, “And how do we keep our balance? I can tell you in one word. Tradition.”

He continues by saying, “Because of our tradition, we’ve kept our balance for many, many years…You may ask, how did this tradition get started. I’ll tell you. I don’t know but it’s a tradition.”

Traditions. We all have them and they pop to the surface and call attention to themselves at Christmas time. If your family is anything like mine, there are just certain Christmas traditions you don’t change or mess with.

Some of those traditions were passed down through our family from one generation to another. Some are traditions Papa and I started ourselves and our grown children say it’s just not Christmas without them. You know, keeping the season balanced, I guess.

I’d like to share just a few of our Christmas traditions with you. Like Tevye though, I don’t know how some of them started.

Bird ornament. When I was a little girl, I remember that my mom always had some kind of bird ornament hanging on the Christmas tree.  I don’t know why, but I recently discovered that such an ornament represents happiness and joy.  I do know that if you look near the top of our tree, you will see a tiny little white bird trimmed in red with wings outstretched. 

Hanging mistletoe.  Again as a small child, I remember mistletoe, which is not native to our area, hanging in a doorway of our family home.  I always giggled when someone kissed beneath it and as a teenage girl, I longed for someone to kiss under that greenery.  You just might receive a little peck on the cheek at our house when you stand beneath the mistletoe in the hallway by our front door. 

Candlelight service. One of my most favorite traditions is attending our church service at 11 p.m. Christmas Eve welcoming in the day we celebrate the birth of the Christ Child at midnight by candlelight while singing Silent Night.

Opening one gift.  Our children actually started this tradition of choosing and opening one gift only on Christmas Eve. When we lived in other areas of the country away from our families, packages would arrive by mail and rest under the tree.  Our kids had a hard time waiting until Christmas Day to open them, so we acquiesced to their pleading and allowed them to open just one the night before.

Christmas dinner menu.  Certain foods must be served or my kids are disappointed. In addition to the baked, glazed ham and twice-baked potatoes, there must be one of two salads – either their favorite frog eye salad or a special molded, multi-layered rainbow colored jello salad that takes forever to make. Growing up, Christmas dinner just wasn’t complete without my mom’s 24-hour salad – a tart fruit salad with homemade mayonnaise. And I believe I was the only member of the family who didn’t like it. So that’s why our traditional salad is different.

Cookies. There must be cookies – lots of Christmas cookies.  They can include old favorites like my mom’s tea cakes, peanut butter blossoms (Papa’s favorites), and M&M cookies, or new recipes but the tray must be full.  And there MUST be sugar cookies in the shapes of stars, trees, Santa, snowmen, and bells, and they must be iced and decorated.  This is a tradition that my kids loved growing up because they got to help cut out the shapes and decorate with scads of sugars and candies.

Candles in the windows. Even Papa inquires whether we’re placing candles in our windows for the Christmas season and we do, every year. Each window in the front of our home is lit up by one solitary electric candle.  This tradition came from my family. When I was young, my mother placed red wreaths, made out of some cellophane type of material, in each of our windows. In the center of those wreaths was an electric candle. I’ve heard that a candle in the window in colonial times meant you were welcome in that place. For us, it also represents welcoming the Christ Child into our lives.

Advent calendar.  Not just any old advent calendar marking the days until Christmas, but one that when you open each day’s door, you find a chocolate candy goodie waiting for you. There’s one in the kitchen right now that little one (our nearly two-year-old granddaughter) is enjoying.  A tradition she’s learning about already.

Chocolate oranges. Somewhere along the line, we started the tradition of having dark chocolate oranges – a chocolate candy flavored and shaped like an orange that you break apart into ‘slices’ for the holiday. As a child, there was always an orange in my stocking and I think it stemmed from that.  Just the other day, our middle daughter arrived home and said, “guess what I bought?” Yep, a chocolate orange to savor on Christmas. Another tradition we will probably be passing down to our granddaughter.

Christmas Eve sundaes. This one is an absolute must and our grown kids always ask to make sure I have all the ingredients for the special sundaes we eat only on Christmas Eve. Unlike some of our traditions, I know exactly where this one came from and how it started.

Back when Papa and Mama were young married folk with only one child, we lived in Oklahoma. Papa’s parents came to visit us for the holiday and we took them to Tulsa for a sight-seeing trip. 

We visited a quaint little ice cream shop – I can’t remember the name of it but do remember the sundaes we ate there. And those sundaes were recreated into our family Christmas Eve sundaes which we serve every single year after dinner.

Our sundaes consist of scoops of green chocolate mint chip ice cream with Hershey’s chocolate syrup in between the scoops. Whipped cream tops them off garnished by a red maraschino cherry, red and green sugar sprinkles, and either a mini candy cane or peppermint stick.  All served in a fancy glass as shown in my photo above.

Traditions. Good things with good memories.What are some of your favorite Christmas traditions?

“At the heart of every family tradition is a meaningful experience.” ~ unknown

©2016 mamasemptynest.wordpress.com

 

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15 responses

  1. I think traditions remind us of who we are, where we came from, and what we hold most dear. They hold families together, especially at special times like Christmas. Our family traditions have changed as the boys have grown up, moved out, blended with other families, and started their own but there are some that will always be followed because they link us one to the other, and to the past (several years ago I decided it was time to stop putting a brand new toothbrush in the boys’ stockings – because they were, after all, grown ups – and they were quite put out; I haven’t forgotten since). I gave the Playmobile Advent set (24 boxes, each with a tiny toy inside to add to a Christmas scene) we brought home from Disney World when the boys were little to my granddaughter this year, and she’s entranced with the idea of opening a box every day before breakfast (although I think she’s peeked inside most of them already!) New traditions will be formed as our family grows and changes and I’m looking forward to experiencing them all! (And those sundaes look – as my granddaughter would say – yee yee yum!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • So well said, Margo! I had to laugh at your boys still wanting their new toothbrushes! Yep, I still fill stockings for my grown up kids and their spouses too. And even though they are way past that age of stockings, they still love it. How sweet that your granddaughter now has the Advent set. Precious! Oh, yes, our sundaes are “yee yee yum.” 😉

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  2. It was nice to read about your traditions. Mine have changed over the years, but the dark chocolate oranges are a tradition for Marshall to receive in his stocking (along with the Farmers Almanac). Those 2 things are “givens”.
    I’ve always had a candle in each window, too, and a “live” greenery wreath on the door, boxwood if I can find it.
    Our traditions now are to invite Marshall for Christmas morning breakfast. Then, later in the evening, he returns, and we open our gifts.
    Merry Christmas to you and yours!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. We share the cookies, advent calendars (each of our kids had their own that I made), Christmas Eve candlelight service and a certain ornament, only ours is a Christmas pickle made of blown glass. Yes, that’s right. You can search and read about that tradition. Son received one when he was little from a friend and his family, and first one to find it gets a prize. I also have our manger out, even though I now leave it out year-round, just because I want to. Our “must do” tradition these days is having little sausage toasts for breakfast on Christmas morning with our sweet treats. When the kids were very small, I started letting them eat some sweet treats that morning, rather than insisting that they wait until later in the day. The adults that shared that morning with us decided to dive in, too! These days, we have sausage toasts with scrambled eggs, followed by our “dessert” of those sweets. Oh, and one of those sweets is usually a green Rice Krispie holiday wreath (made in my bundt pan) that has red hots stuck in the sides while it is still warm. Must admit that the sausage toasts are sooooo good… a recipe I got from my mother, and one she got from a friend at church. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, of course you and I share some traditions. We are so-like minded! 😉 And guess what? We have the glass pickle on our tree too!! I think I want to come to your house for Christmas morning breakfast. Sounds delish! Love that you shared your traditions with me, sweet friend.

  4. This is the first I’ve heard of chocolate oranges. It’s become tradition for us to travel to our daughter’s home. She makes overnight French toast for breakfast on Christmas morning. I’ve been asked to bring the pizzelle (waffle cookie) iron with me, so that’s a continuing tradition. My cousin and I helped make them at our grandmother’s house, so I’ve passed that on to the next generation.

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